Play Killer Poker http://www.playkillerpoker.com Learn How to Play Poker Thu, 03 Jan 2013 14:52:18 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=3.9.3 US Poker Players Play at Americas Cardroom http://www.playkillerpoker.com/poker-news/americas-cardroom-accepts-us-poker-players.html http://www.playkillerpoker.com/poker-news/americas-cardroom-accepts-us-poker-players.html#comments Sun, 11 Dec 2011 14:02:51 +0000 http://www.playkillerpoker.com/?p=1580 Poker players in the US can now play online poker at Americas Cardroom. The site has been around since 2001, and recently hit the news with its acquisition of Doylesroom.com – the home of poker legend Doyle Brunson. Like Doyles Room, the site is on the Yatahay network. Americas Cardroom plans to continue acquiring smaller […]

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Americas CardroomPoker players in the US can now play online poker at Americas Cardroom. The site has been around since 2001, and recently hit the news with its acquisition of Doylesroom.com – the home of poker legend Doyle Brunson.

Like Doyles Room, the site is on the Yatahay network. Americas Cardroom plans to continue acquiring smaller poker skins in the months to come, meaning liquidity on the site should improve on a monthly basis.

Players can deposit and withdraw funds using Neteller, and there is a $50 deposit limit.

The site’s headline promotion is ACROSS – Americas Cardroom Online Super Series – which took place recently with 19 events and a guarantaeed prize pool of $150k. Admittedly, this is pretty small compared to the size of PokerStars’ WCOOP and SCOOP poker series, and Full Tilt’s FTOPs, but right now this is the best US players can hope for. Plus the site will attract plenty of fish.

Other promotions include the BankRoll Builder Tournaments (buy-in $1), Bad Beat Jackpots, and various deepstack and super-turbo tourneys. Satellites to live tourney’s can be found in qualifiers for the Punta Cana Poker Classic.

Head over to Americas Cardroom, and start playing poker today!

© 2011 – 2013, Play Killer Poker. All rights reserved.

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Americas Cardroom – Online Poker Room Review http://www.playkillerpoker.com/poker-sites/americas-cardroom-online-poker-room-review.html http://www.playkillerpoker.com/poker-sites/americas-cardroom-online-poker-room-review.html#comments Sun, 13 Nov 2011 18:31:57 +0000 http://www.playkillerpoker.com/?p=1549 Americas Cardroom has a long history in online poker, having been established in 2001. It recently increased its presence in the market place by acquiring a number of smaller sites, including DoylesRoom.com – the home of American poker legend and two-timeWorld Series of Poker World Champion Doyle Brunson. The site is on the Yatahay network, […]

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Americas CardroomAmericas Cardroom has a long history in online poker, having been established in 2001. It recently increased its presence in the market place by acquiring a number of smaller sites, including DoylesRoom.com – the home of American poker legend and two-timeWorld Series of Poker World Champion Doyle Brunson.

The site is on the Yatahay network, and as US players can play on the site FPP Free Parking.

Security and Payment Methods

Players can deposit and withdraw cash from their account using Neteller. There is a minimum $50 deposit.

Software

The Yatahay network is growing fast, and the poker software is easy to download and simple to use, with all the usual features expected from a popular online poker room.

Americas Cardroom Lobby

Americas Cardroom Lobby

 

Promotions

Americas Cardroom features a number of promotions, with a mix of freerolls, guaranteed tournaments, speed tournaments, and points races.

The headline event is the Americas Cardroom Online Super Series. ACROSS runs for a week, featuring 19 events and a guaranteed prize pool of $150k, including a $50k guarantee for the Main Event. It also features a number of other competitions, including the Bubble Boy Bonus, Kings of Cashing, and Multiple Cashes Bonus. Cash buy-ins start from $3.30, and there are also FPP buy-ins.

For the player looking to build a bankroll, the site’s TGIFF promo gives players 12 Friday freerolls, with prize pools of between $50 and $150.

The site also offers BankRoll Builder Tournaments, with a buy-in of $1, a Bad Beat Jackpot, the Ridiculous Deep Stack tournament (1 million chips for a $2 buy-in), and Chip and a Chair tournaments – super turbo games where players start with only 5 chips!

For players looking for live poker action, the site also runs qualifier tournaments for the Punta Cana Poker Classic.

Customer Support

Support is available 24/7, and players can contact support either through email, live chat, or telephone. When Americas Cardroom acquired Doyles Room it took all the staff too. Good news for players considering Doyles Room has won awards for its customer service.

Americas Cardroom Table

Americas Cardroom Table

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

PROS
• Part of the Yatahay networkAccepts players from the USA
• Mostly a low stake site with lots of fish!
• Regular tournaments with big-money guarantees
• The $1,000 deposit bonus makes it one of the best in the business

CONS
• Small selection of games compared to some other sites
• Software lacks some of the more advanced features offered by bigger online poker rooms

Download Americas Cardroom and start playing poker now!

© 2011 – 2013, Play Killer Poker. All rights reserved.

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Poker Bankroll Management – Part 4 http://www.playkillerpoker.com/poker-strategy/poker-bankroll-management-part-4.html http://www.playkillerpoker.com/poker-strategy/poker-bankroll-management-part-4.html#comments Fri, 30 Sep 2011 14:55:35 +0000 http://www.playkillerpoker.com/?p=1532 Variance increases as the speed of the tourney goes up, but comes down with the greater number of games you can play. So if you switch from regular SNGs to turbos, but you’re playing more, you can stick to the bankroll requirements above. But if you’re playing the same amount, you’ll need to increase your […]

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Table of contents for Poker Bankroll Management

  1. Poker Bankroll Management – Part 1
  2. Poker Bankroll Management – Part 2
  3. Poker Bankroll Management – Part 3
  4. Poker Bankroll Management – Part 4

Poker StrategyVariance increases as the speed of the tourney goes up, but comes down with the greater number of games you can play. So if you switch from regular SNGs to turbos, but you’re playing more, you can stick to the bankroll requirements above. But if you’re playing the same amount, you’ll need to increase your bankroll, by about x1.5 the amounts described previously.

Bankroll Management for Cash Games

Cash games are probably the safest game to play in terms of variance. Unlike tournaments, you’ll spend less time buying into an event and getting nothing when you don’t cash, or scoring big when you finish in the top three. In cash games, you’ll win and lose smaller amounts, with the occasional session when you’ll win or lose a few buy-ins.

Because of the reduction in variance, the basic rule with cash games is that you’ll need 40 buy-ins as your bankroll, with a single buy-in being 100 big blinds. So if you’re playing at a $1-$2 small blind/big blind level, you’ll need $200 for a single buy-in and therefore a bankroll of 40 x $200 = $8,000.

Again, you can make adjustments depending on several factors. The first is the number of opponents. If you’re playing six-max or heads-up then variance increases, the games are more aggressive and you’ll need a bigger bankroll to play safe.

Game selection is also a factor. Regardless of the level you’re playing at, you’ll still want to choose games to play in where you’re better than most of your opponents and therefore stand a better chance of both winning and increasing your win rate. This is usually calculated as the number of big blinds you win every 100 hands, for example 5BB per 100 hands.

Your style of play is another factor. If you’re a tight player then you’ll reduce your variance, but if you’re loose/aggressive you’ll get into more difficult situations when you could be a big favourite or a big underdog. Therefore your variance will naturally increase and you’ll need to increase your bankroll requirements accordingly.

© 2011, Play Killer Poker. All rights reserved.

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Poker Bankroll Management – Part 3 http://www.playkillerpoker.com/poker-strategy/poker-bankroll-management-part-3.html http://www.playkillerpoker.com/poker-strategy/poker-bankroll-management-part-3.html#comments Tue, 27 Sep 2011 14:47:55 +0000 http://www.playkillerpoker.com/?p=1528 Two other things to consider for MTT bankroll management. Variance reduces over time, so the more MTTs you play, the less variance will affect you. This makes playing more than one tournament at a time appealing. However, be honest with how many MTTs you can play at one time, without it affecting your game. It’s […]

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Table of contents for Poker Bankroll Management

  1. Poker Bankroll Management – Part 1
  2. Poker Bankroll Management – Part 2
  3. Poker Bankroll Management – Part 3
  4. Poker Bankroll Management – Part 4

Poker StrategyTwo other things to consider for MTT bankroll management. Variance reduces over time, so the more MTTs you play, the less variance will affect you. This makes playing more than one tournament at a time appealing. However, be honest with how many MTTs you can play at one time, without it affecting your game. It’s better to play one or two well, than four or more badly.

The other factor is speed. Turbo and super-turbo tournaments, where the blinds go up faster than normal tourneys, can also be appealing, because you can fit more MTTs (and therefore more volume) in. But be aware that variance is higher in these tournaments, due to the increased number of times you’ll find yourself all-in with a marginal hand, so they can be a false economy.

Bankroll Management for Sit-n-Gos

Sit-n-gos pay out a higher percentage of the field than MTTs, but variance is a still a big consideration when thinking about your poker bankroll and the amount you can afford to buy in for. It’s not uncommon for downswings – that is, when you’re playing good poker but still losing – to go on for 50 buy-ins, and possibly longer.

Some of the top SNG pros believe that you need a minimum of 65 buy-ins (that’s a bankroll of 65 x the buy-in of the sit-n-go) to be reasonably confident that you won’t go broke in six- or nine-seat SNGs. And obviously if you’re reducing your buy-in as your bankroll diminishes during a downswing, this shouldn’t happen at all.

The bankroll requirement changes depending on the number of players in the sit-n-go tournament. For heads-up sit-n-gos, 40 buy-ins is probably a reasonable bankroll, whereas with the 18-player variety, 90 buy-ins is a safer calculation, as the percentage of the field that makes it into the money falls as the number of players goes up.

You’ll also need to take into account whether you’re playing turbo or regular speed SNGs. The faster the blinds go up, the more variance will occur, so you should take that into account when calculating the level of buy-in you can play at. But you should also take into account the number of additional games you can play at the turbo level (simply because they finish faster).

© 2011, Play Killer Poker. All rights reserved.

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Poker Bankroll Management – Part 2 http://www.playkillerpoker.com/poker-strategy/poker-bankroll-management-part-2.html http://www.playkillerpoker.com/poker-strategy/poker-bankroll-management-part-2.html#comments Sat, 24 Sep 2011 14:34:01 +0000 http://www.playkillerpoker.com/?p=1525 Bankroll Management for MTTs Multi-table tournaments (MTTs) have a high variance. This means you’re much more likely not to win anything than other poker games. But when you do win, you win big. Remember, MTTs regularly only pay out around the top 10% in the field, and even that figure is misleading because a huge […]

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Table of contents for Poker Bankroll Management

  1. Poker Bankroll Management – Part 1
  2. Poker Bankroll Management – Part 2
  3. Poker Bankroll Management – Part 3
  4. Poker Bankroll Management – Part 4

Poker StrategyBankroll Management for MTTs

Multi-table tournaments (MTTs) have a high variance. This means you’re much more likely not to win anything than other poker games. But when you do win, you win big. Remember, MTTs regularly only pay out around the top 10% in the field, and even that figure is misleading because a huge percentage of the cash lies in coming in the top three. The higher the variance, the more likely you are to go bust if you don’t manage your bankroll.

There are a couple of common rules-of-thumb to calculate the buy-in you can afford with your bankroll. The most popular is that you can only afford to buy-in to a poker tournament with 1% of your bankroll. The other – 2% – was made famous by Full Tilt Poker’s Chris ‘Jesus’ Ferguson, on his bankroll challenge when he ran up $10,000 from nothing, by starting off playing freerolls. But let’s remember, he’s a top pro and WSOP Main Event winner!

The fact is that you don’t need to stick to such a rigid buy-in. If you have $1,000 in your bankroll, that doesn’t mean you can never take a shot at a $20 tournament until you’ve built it up to $2,000. It’s the average buy-in that’s the key!

Let’s say you have that $1,000. According to the general rule, you’d be playing only $10 tournaments. That doesn’t mean you can’t take a shot at a $20 MTT. But if you do, your next three tournaments should be around the $5 level.

Variance also increases with the size of the field, as you’ll have to play more hands to get into the money, and it’s tougher to finish in the top three. Low buy-in tournaments have the biggest fields, because there are more low-stakes players.

To counteract the high variance in low buy-in poker MTTs, try mixing it up by also playing capped tournaments (where the number of players is limited) or 45- or 180-player multi-table SNGs (sit-n-gos). Keep an eye on the field size of your MTTs and if it’s regularly a huge number, consider reducing your buy-in.

© 2011, Play Killer Poker. All rights reserved.

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Poker Bankroll Management – Part 1 http://www.playkillerpoker.com/poker-strategy/poker-bankroll-management-part-1.html http://www.playkillerpoker.com/poker-strategy/poker-bankroll-management-part-1.html#comments Wed, 21 Sep 2011 07:36:19 +0000 http://www.playkillerpoker.com/?p=1520 When you’re learning how to play poker, bankroll management is one of the key skills to develop. If you don’t have the bankroll, you can’t play poker. We looked at the basics of bankroll management Basic Bankroll Management, as part of the Key Concepts of Poker series of posts. This series of posts will expand […]

Poker Bankroll Management – Part 1 is a post from: Play Killer Poker

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Table of contents for Poker Bankroll Management

  1. Poker Bankroll Management – Part 1
  2. Poker Bankroll Management – Part 2
  3. Poker Bankroll Management – Part 3
  4. Poker Bankroll Management – Part 4

Poker StrategyWhen you’re learning how to play poker, bankroll management is one of the key skills to develop. If you don’t have the bankroll, you can’t play poker. We looked at the basics of bankroll management Basic Bankroll Management, as part of the Key Concepts of Poker series of posts. This series of posts will expand your understanding further – master these lessons and you’ll always have money to play poker.

It’s true that most players play a mix of cash games, tournaments (MTTs), and sit-n-gos (SNGs), but most tend to play one form of poker more than the others. To better understand bankroll management we’re going to drill down into those three areas, to give you a better understanding.

Discipline is King

Before we get started, let’s deal with one of the biggest stumbling blocks to effective bankroll management. And that is, being ‘forced’ to play at levels you think are too low. As we go through these articles, DON’T be disappointed when they suggest that you play at levels you may consider too low. And definitely DON’T ignore them.

However, if you’ve read bankroll management articles before, and find that you can’t stick to the guidelines, carry on reading. There’s information here that you’ll find very interesting, and incredibly useful, in learning how to actually MANAGE a bankroll, rather than sticking to rigid guidelines.

The key thing to remember about bankroll management is that you have to earn the chance to play at higher levels, by winning. If you stick to these rules, then you’ll eventually find a level at which you’re a winning player, and the more you win the bigger your bankroll. The bigger your bankroll, the higher you can play. But ultimately you’ll ALWAYS be playing, and not having to reload.

Sure, there are times to reload, such as when your poker room offers you a reload bonus. But your ultimate goal is never to reload, to play only with your profits, and win enough to be able to withdraw funds from your bankroll to pay for the things in your life that you enjoy, whether that’s a holiday, a car… these are your ultimate goals when you’re looking to become a winning poker player.

© 2011, Play Killer Poker. All rights reserved.

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A Guide to 3-Betting – Part 5 http://www.playkillerpoker.com/poker-strategy/guide-3-betting-part-5.html http://www.playkillerpoker.com/poker-strategy/guide-3-betting-part-5.html#comments Sun, 18 Sep 2011 09:00:13 +0000 http://www.playkillerpoker.com/?p=1514 The math problem here is to work our equity in the hand and the EV (expected value) of making the play, to work out if calling or folding will show a profit over time. In all the following examples, we will assume that we are playing at a nine-handed table, with blinds and antes of […]

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Table of contents for A Guide to 3-Betting

  1. A Guide to 3-Betting – Part 1
  2. A Guide to 3-Betting – Part 2
  3. A Guide to 3-Betting – Part 3
  4. A Guide to 3-Betting – Part 4
  5. A Guide to 3-Betting – Part 5

Texas Holdem PokerThe math problem here is to work our equity in the hand and the EV (expected value) of making the play, to work out if calling or folding will show a profit over time.

In all the following examples, we will assume that we are playing at a nine-handed table, with blinds and antes of 2,000/4,000/500 – so the total in the pot at the start of the hand is 10,500. You open the hand for 10,000, and the button shoves all-in for 70,000. You need to call 60,000 to win a 90,500 (10,500 + your bet of 10,000 + the villain’s shove of 70,000).

You’re being offered pot odds of 90,500/60,000 or 1.5:1, or 3:2. However, to calculate the equity in the hand we need to add the call value to the total in the pot, and divide the call value by the new pot to create a percentage. 90,500 + 60,000 is 150,500. 60,000/150,500 = 0.398. Expressed as a percentage that’s 39.8%, so our call needs to win the pot 39.8% of the time to break even over time.

That calculation looks complex, but what we’re basically working out here is theh number of times we have to win to make winning that amount of money, for that amount of risk (the chips used to call) worthwhile, or a +EV move as it’s known in poker.

Now we’re going to assume we hold three different hands, and compare them against three different opponents. Our three hands are 4♠4♥, 8♥8♣, and A♦Q♠. We’re going to use PokerStove to calculate our opponents ranges, and our winning percentage for each hand against each range.

  • Against a Tight Player

We assume here that the villain shoving all-in will only do this with the top 6-7% of hands. According to PokerStove, that’s 8-8+, A-Ts+, K-Qs, and A-Qo+. Following is our equity against this range for each of our hands.

4♠4♥ = 36%
8♥8♣ = 38%
A♦Q♠ = 41%

Considering the tight range of our opponent’s hands, only the A♦Q♠ has the required equity to make calling the villain’s shove a +EV move in the long run, but it’s close to a neutral EV play. That said, it would probably be difficult to lay down the 8♥8♣ in this spot. That would be a very difficult decision to make, and we should also probably consider other factors, like how much winning this hand would increase our stack compared to our opponents, and give us a clear shot at positions 1-3 on the money ladder.

  • Against a Standard Player

In this case, we’re assuming our opponent will three-bet shove all-in with the top 10% of hands, which is a reasonable percentage for most experienced players at this stage of a tournament. Looking at PokerStove, we can put the villain in the following range of hands: 8-8+, A-9s+, K-Ts+, Q-Ts+, A-Jo+, and K-Qo. Our equity against this range is:

4♠4♥= 41%
8♥8♣ = 44%
A♦Q♠ = 51%

As our opponent’s three-betting range loosens, the chances of calling his all-in becomes increasingly +EV. Again, the 4♠4♥ looks almost neutral EV, but the 8♥8♣ and A♦Q♠ become automatic calls.

  • Against a Loose Player

This guy is shoving looser than our previous two opponents – maybe his HUD is telling him that we have a high chance of folding to three-bets? He’s making this move with the top 15% of hands, and again PokerStove is telling us his range is: 7-7+, A-7s+, K-9s+, Q-Ts+, J-Ts, A-To+, K-To+, Q-Jo. Our equity here is:

4♠4♥= 44%
8♥8♣ = 48%
A♦Q♠ = 56%

Our decision now becomes much simpler – it’s an automatic call with any of our three hands. However, remember that these calculations are designed to work out whether the play will show a profit in the long term. So don’t go on tilt if your loose opponent turns over Aces. You’ll just have to lick your wounds, fire up another tournament and console yourself that you made the right decision.

© 2011, Play Killer Poker. All rights reserved.

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A Guide to 3-Betting – Part 4 http://www.playkillerpoker.com/poker-strategy/guide-3-betting-part-4.html http://www.playkillerpoker.com/poker-strategy/guide-3-betting-part-4.html#comments Thu, 15 Sep 2011 14:37:51 +0000 http://www.playkillerpoker.com/?p=1512 Bet sizing also needs to be reconsidered now, as three-betting 2.5 to 3 times the original raise is less important than sizing your bet depending on the effective stack sizes. What you need to do here is consider the effective stack sizes in the pot (that is, the lowest stack size), how much money your […]

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Table of contents for A Guide to 3-Betting

  1. A Guide to 3-Betting – Part 1
  2. A Guide to 3-Betting – Part 2
  3. A Guide to 3-Betting – Part 3
  4. A Guide to 3-Betting – Part 4
  5. A Guide to 3-Betting – Part 5

Texas Holdem PokerBet sizing also needs to be reconsidered now, as three-betting 2.5 to 3 times the original raise is less important than sizing your bet depending on the effective stack sizes. What you need to do here is consider the effective stack sizes in the pot (that is, the lowest stack size), how much money your bet will leave in yours and your opponent’s stack (if he calls), and the pot odds you’ll be offering with your three-bet.

  • Fighting the Three-Bet

With stacks of 30-50BB virtually every four-bet you make should be all-in – otherwise you won’t have enough left in your stack to make an effective continuation bet without being pot committed, or force your opponent off the pot because of the pot odds.

Flat calling only becomes an option with Aces or Kings, for deception. However, the argument to also four-bet all-in with these hands is strong, firstly for value, and secondly because a call will signal that you have a monster hand to an experienced opponent.

Folding is another good option, particularly if you don’t have a hand strong enough to four-bet with (and you don’t like the chances of it working as a bluff), and you don’t have a plan for how you’ll act after the flop if you call. The only other thing to consider here is, if you fold to three-bets a lot at this stage, you’ll need to tighten up the range of hands you’re willing to open with, otherwise your opponents will increase their three-bet frequency and you’ll be leaking chips.

Endgame of a Tournament

  • When to Three-Bet

You’re now in the money and shooting to win the tournament, or at the least come second or third. The effective stack size will now be around the 20BB range, and therefore a lot of hands are going to be decided preflop. Most three-bets will be all in, and mostly your decisions will be to three-bet all-in or to call an opponent’s shove.

You should now be trying to work out who is trying to win the tournament and who is trying to sneak up the money ladder. Winners will be looking to three-bet all in, particularly against stacks of a similar size, and against anyone opening the pot in late position. The guys looking to sneak up the money ladder will be playing much less aggressively, avoiding all-in confrontations unless they have a real hand.

  • Fighting the Three-Bet

At this point it all comes down to hand ranges and math. Four-bets will be all-in 95% of the time. Having a HUD (heads-up display) like Holdem Manager, to give you an idea of your opponents’ opening, three-betting and calling ranges can be invaluable at this stage.

© 2011, Play Killer Poker. All rights reserved.

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A Guide to 3-Betting – Part 3 http://www.playkillerpoker.com/poker-strategy/guide-3-betting-part-3.html http://www.playkillerpoker.com/poker-strategy/guide-3-betting-part-3.html#comments Mon, 12 Sep 2011 14:17:36 +0000 http://www.playkillerpoker.com/?p=1509 You can also flat call with hands you want to see a flop with (medium pairs, suited connectors) but aren’t strong enough to four-bet. However, flat calling might be a mistake for two reasons. The first is, if you consider that most three-bets are being made for value at this stage of the tournament, you […]

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Table of contents for A Guide to 3-Betting

  1. A Guide to 3-Betting – Part 1
  2. A Guide to 3-Betting – Part 2
  3. A Guide to 3-Betting – Part 3
  4. A Guide to 3-Betting – Part 4
  5. A Guide to 3-Betting – Part 5

Texas Holdem PokerYou can also flat call with hands you want to see a flop with (medium pairs, suited connectors) but aren’t strong enough to four-bet.

However, flat calling might be a mistake for two reasons. The first is, if you consider that most three-bets are being made for value at this stage of the tournament, you might be better off getting more chips in the middle.
The second is, when you call you’re going to be facing a continuation bet about 60-70% of the time after the flop, so you have to have a plan to combat this too. Floating (that is, calling the continuation bet with no made hand) will commit a lot of chips to the pot at this stage, so if you do flat call you need to have some potential for this hand to hit the flop hard.

Mid Stages of a Tournament

  • When to Three-Bet

At this stage of the tournament, the average stack will be between 30-50 big blinds, although there will be a wide range of stack sizes at most tables. The antes will also have kicked in.

You should be looking for any stack over 40BB as a three-bet target, with a bluff, semi-bluff, or real hand, as you can stand to pick up a lot of chips with a successful three-bet. But you can also fold to a four-bet and still have a decent stack.

You should, by now, also have a decent read on your opponents’ abilities and playing tendencies (assuming you haven’t been moved too much). The fact a number of hands have gone to showdown, added to the fact that the antes are now in play, will loosen up the action and make three-betting more common.

This means you’ll also have to open up the range of hands you’re willing to four-bet with. But be wary of players with stacks of 20BB or less, particularly if they’re to your left, as these stacks are perfect to three-bet all-in with. If you are in this situation, be careful to only play hands that you’re willing to call an all-in with.

Position is still an important factor to consider, but it’s less important now, purely because the stack sizes mean there will be less postflop play. If you bet, an opponent raises, and you call, there’s not so much in the pot compared to the effective stack sizes that a continuation bet will virtually commit you to the pot, while moving all-in will give your opponent great odds to call. So when you have stacks around the 30-50BB mark, remember it’s better to fold or four-bet than it is to flat call.

© 2011 – 2012, Play Killer Poker. All rights reserved.

A Guide to 3-Betting – Part 3 is a post from: Play Killer Poker

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A Guide to 3-Betting – Part 2 http://www.playkillerpoker.com/poker-strategy/guide-3-betting-part-2.html http://www.playkillerpoker.com/poker-strategy/guide-3-betting-part-2.html#comments Fri, 09 Sep 2011 14:02:39 +0000 http://www.playkillerpoker.com/?p=1506 The marginal hands, meanwhile, are three-bet for speculation, with the three-bet achieving a number of things. Firstly, a player that three-bets a hand like T♣9♣ represents a hand like A♠A♥, and either forces his opponents to fold pre-flop, or sets up a bluff on the flop if a Ace or King hits. Secondly, he’s also […]

A Guide to 3-Betting – Part 2 is a post from: Play Killer Poker

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Table of contents for A Guide to 3-Betting

  1. A Guide to 3-Betting – Part 1
  2. A Guide to 3-Betting – Part 2
  3. A Guide to 3-Betting – Part 3
  4. A Guide to 3-Betting – Part 4
  5. A Guide to 3-Betting – Part 5

Texas Holdem PokerThe marginal hands, meanwhile, are three-bet for speculation, with the three-bet achieving a number of things. Firstly, a player that three-bets a hand like T♣9♣ represents a hand like A♠A♥, and either forces his opponents to fold pre-flop, or sets up a bluff on the flop if a Ace or King hits. Secondly, he’s also building the pot should he hit the flop hard with his suited connectors, meaning his opponents will be unlikely to see the straight, and also be committed to large bets and calls post-flop. Thirdly, he can easily fold to a four-bet (a re-re-raise) pre-flop as the stacks are so deep.

In low stakes tournaments, however, many less-experienced players will limit their three-bets predominantly to very strong starting hands.

Because stacks are deep, position is all-important. That means anyone three-betting out of position is most likely to have a strong hand that they’re betting for value.

You must also consider the size of your (or your opponent’s) three-bet. A standard three-bet size is anything between 2.5 to three times the initial raise. So if the blinds are 10c/20c, the initial bet is 60c, the raise is $1.80, then the three-bet would be between $4.50 and $5.40.

Less-experienced players will usually make their three-bets smaller the stronger the hand they have, purely because they want to get called when they have Aces or Kings. Conversely, the bigger their three-bet, the weaker their hand will be, in the hopes that it will induce a fold, but still have some value if called.

You should be aware of this tactic, and use it yourself sparingly. You only have to get caught playing this way twice for your opponents to get a very quick read on you, so make sure you mix your bet sizes up when three-betting.

  • Fighting the Three-Bet

Four-betting is an option, but in the early stages of a tournament you should only make this play with monster hands like Aces, and virtually never as a bluff. The big thing to consider in this situation is whether to shove all-in, or whether a smaller bet will induce a call or over-shove from your opponent.

Flat calling is another option, and has two obvious benefits. Firstly you can flat call for deception when holding Aces or Kings, and also you avoid giving your opponent the option of folding hands like A-Q or J-J when you’re a big favorite.

© 2011, Play Killer Poker. All rights reserved.

A Guide to 3-Betting – Part 2 is a post from: Play Killer Poker

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